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Orthopaedic Associates Blog

The Latest News in Orthopaedics. rss


Can You Drive after a Rotator Cuff Repair?

Can You Drive after a Rotator Cuff Repair?

by Stephanie Meadows
The shoulder is an extremely complex part of the body. Like an elegant piece of machinery, the rotator cuff – a collection of muscles and tendons just above the shoulder joint – allows for a large range of physical motion. Consequently, our shoulders often bear the brunt of many of our daily activities.

Tri-compartmental Syndrome (Osteoarthritis)

Tri-compartmental Syndrome (Osteoarthritis)

by Stephanie Meadows
Did you know that your knee is an extremely complex hinge joint that contains three separate compartments? The three compartments are comprised of the medial (on the inside of the knee), lateral (the outside of the knee) and patellofemoral compartments (the front part of the knee that lies between the kneecap and the thigh bone). Tricompartmental syndrome osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disorder of the knee. It some cases, it may be limited to one or two compartments, or it may include all three compartments and effect the entire knee.

What is Tendonitis?

What is Tendonitis?

by Yenny (SU)
Tendonitis, put simply, is an inflammation of one of the body’s many tendons. Tendons are the strong, fibrous cords that attach muscle to bone. While made of similar material as ligaments, the difference between the two is ligaments connect bone to bone, while tendons connect bone to muscle.

Treating Nerve Pain

Treating Nerve Pain

by Yenny (SU)
Did you know that a pain signal can move at about 0.06 miles per second? It makes sense, because pain signals need to travel very quickly to notify your body of an injury or danger. If it took too long, you could not react to burning your finger on the stove fast enough to prevent serious damage.

Meniscal Tears: What You Need to Know

Meniscal Tears: What You Need to Know

by Yenny (SU)
A torn meniscus is an extremely common, and very painful injury, especially for athletes, although anyone can experience a meniscal tear. The meniscus is a C-shaped disc with a rubbery consistency that help to stabilize your knee, and balance your weight. Each knee has two menisci (the plural of meniscus) on the inner and outer sides of the knee. Menisci are often slow to heal because they have a notoriously poor blood supply when compared to other locations on the body.